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Gateme
https://gateme.com
The Estonian founders of Gateme have gone for a market they believe to be hitherto untapped, yet crying out for a good management system – nightclubs. Their system manages guestlists, tickets and tables and pays out to promoters.

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Maily
http://www.maily.com/
The guys behind Maily noticed that all messaging systems were design for the 10+ age group, with no good way to train your tots on the most important system they’ll come into contact with. Maily, with over 50 thousand users, allows kids to communicate in the way that they understand best – with drawings, photographs and messages of love (we were shown some heart-tugging examples as part of the pitch).

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Minubo
http://minubo.com/
Minubo claim to provide all the Business Information available from a classic system but online and as a service. Their target customers are online shopping businesses.


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Planvine
http://planvine.com/
Planvine have taken a big pain point – manual collection and compilation of event data – and automated some value out of it. They have no competitors in their exact space and they are very cost effective (OK, cheap) compared to traditional event listing companies. I managed to grab an interview with Planvine founder Chris Crossley today and you can hear that on the Tech Talkfest radio show on ZoneOneRadio.com shortly.

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Subscrib
http://subscrib.me/
Starting their pitch with the downsides of Groupon,  Subscrib quickly caught the room’s attention. Clients of subscrib get ongoing discounts for subscribing to local businesses, such as coffee shops – several in the Shoreditch area are signed up already.

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Bukit
http://www.bukit.co/
We heard that Bukit founder Sarah Nadav’s middle class background had meant she avoided debt until a serious of personal crises hit her in later life. Forced to default she was horrified by how the process was managed. The most exciting business of the day, Bukit provides a social service by allowing defaulters to deal directly with their creditors, while making themselves a tidy profit in the process by cutting the debt collectors out of the food chain.

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CrowdProcess
http://crowdprocess.com/
The geekiest startup of the day, CrowdProcess is a solution that will delight the true techies out there. They have built a platform to harness the spare computing power on your machine while you simply browse a website, allowing the website owner to sell on this micro-power to industries requiring giant computations. An alternative at last to tedious advertising?

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Futurelytics
http://www.futurelytics.com/
Do you know who your best customers are? Find that oft touted 20% who make up 80% of your revenue with Futurelytics. They provide sales data analysis but as a service – a snip at $450/month.

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Hole19
http://www.hole19golf.com/
Nothing is more guaranteed to get investors going than a description of a captive, loose-walleted market such as golf. The Portuguese team’s Hole19 Caddy app enhances the keen golfer’s performance in many ways, keeping track of your location on the course, alerting you to changes in wind speed and direction and even recommending which club to use.

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Knowable
http://beta.knowable.org/
Knowable provide a social network for makers of things, a “GitHub for the real world”. Inventors and creators can record their instruction manuals online, where they can be modified and improved by enthusiastic participants.

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Qamine
http://www.qamine.com/
Qamine are pleased to offer an automated testing service, which they underlined with a joke that they were rather proud of: “Finding bugs without bugging you”. Most innovative is their “pay per bug” pricing structure meaning you only pay if your code improves. Bad news if you want to try them out though – you’ll be at the back of a 50 person beta queue.

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Codeship
http://www.codeship.io/
Github holds your source control and Heroku manages your live environment, but how do you get from one to the other? The answer is probably custom made or, worse, manual. Codeship automates the process for rails, php, python and java projects, along with testing on the way to make sure you’re not deploying something that you didn’t mean to check in.

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Sayduck
http://www.sayduck.com/
Arriving at my evening appointment after Seedcamp, I was told that “augmented reality is all the thing”. It’s certainly something I’ve seen in many places over the last few months, including a virtual dressing room at Cisco House for the Olympics. Sayduck’s implementation certainly looked to be one of the best out there at a demo by founder Niklas Slotte sporting several handbags – to the great delight of the audience.


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tl;dr
http://tldr.io/
tl;dr claim to be “taming the web”. A more accurate (and concise?) tagline would be that they are “summarising the web”. They achieve this via an army of volunteers in a similar way to other crowd-created information sources such as Wikipedia or Duolingo. Responding well to the audience challenge to their name (it’s a well known online acronym meaning “Too Long Don’t Read”, an excellent summary of their business), tl;dr made a lot of friends today.


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http://unifyo.com/
The final presentation from Cambridge-based Unifyo showed a lot of us what we are missing in terms of CRM data – Unifyo can link up your business contacts across LinkedIn, Twitter and custom websites *and* across all of your salespeople. Which is just as well, as they have finished their funding round and were pitching for new users.

This entry was posted on Saturday, February 9th, 2013 at 5:23 pm and is filed under Women Tech. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.